triathlon and family can mix

Posts tagged “ironman

Ironman Tattoo

M. Dot.

im

It seems like a right of passage. Cross the finish line and straight to the tattoo parlour. The more I see them around the gym, pool, path, or beach these days, I wonder if I would get one.

First, to qualify I am sure you have to finish a long distance Triathlon, all 226.3 kilometers of it. Second, you need to be proud of it. How could you not be? Not many people would attempt it, let alone finish it.

I think there is a stigma around people who have an Ironman tattoo. Some opinions say that ‘are they not proud of anything else than finishing that race x years ago’. I don’t think this is the case; starting, let alone finishing a long distance triathlon is a feat. I think it is a celebration of something that they have worked hard at achieving. Trust me, the amount of training hours that come along with the finish can be staggering. Average 11 hours per week with 3 hour bike rides on Saturday and 2 hours runs on Sunday; not to mention strength training and your real life. This is what I averaged in preparation for Ironman 70.3 Calgary, a half distance triathlon.

So back to my original thought.

Would I ever get a tattoo?

I love this sport and all of the tangible and intangible benefits that have come along with it. I am in the best shape of my life, my energy levels are thru the roof, and my daughter is racing as well. I will talk about it with anyone that asks, and hey, alot of people who don’t (sorry if you have been one of the unwilling listeners in the past). The people I have met including instructors, physiotherapists, and fellow triathletes over the past two years have made a positive impact on my life. Thank you for that.

I just find it hard to want to advertise it to the entire world, all the time. I mean having people check out your tattoo, check you out (elevator look?), then make a judgment based on your current physical condition is something I would like to avoid. “He has an Ironman tattoo, he doesn’t look like he could finish the walk up the stairs!”

I am just saying I don’t think that I would get one. Better to leave the memory where it belongs, in my mind.

Just a thought: Do you need to show proof, like a picture of you crossing the finish line or a secret membership card? I sure hope so.

Question: Would you get an Ironman Tattoo?


Long Course Triathlon

Steppin’ up.

cda-swim-start

I struggle with the prospect each year of stepping up to the next distance. In 2013 I participated in Olympic distance races and enjoyed each and every one; in 2014, I plan on racing mostly Ironman 70.3. Why is there this desire to keep increasing the distance? Like my wife has pointed out, increasing distance is just increasing the time you suffer out there.

So it got me thinking, dangerous right? In every triathletes mind, is it a question of not if, but when you will sign up for Ironman?

I know a lot of triathletes who’s first ever triathlon was Ironman (now Challenge) Penticton. Some have gone on to finish in multiple years, and some have left the sport all together.

With the prospect of racing in what can arguably be called the toughest endurance event in the world the rewards are huge. There is obviously the bragging rights that come along with crossing the finish line and the satisfaction of fulfilling a goal that you set more than likely a year prior.

There are also the fringe benefits like getting into great shape, changing your view on nutrition, and meeting other triathletes during the journey. Then there is the gear, oh the gear. Having an upcoming race gives you the excuse to buy things you never could justify before.

I have said it before, and I will say it again; a long course triathlon seems daunting to me.

I could handle the swim, actually I think that I would really enjoy it. With that many people on the beach I think it would be an absolute riot to swim toward the first buoy knocking elbows, knees, and feet with the racers around me. The bike doesn’t scare me either; it is all about consistency. Get in the saddle, keep your effort level in check, and eat/drink as much as you can. I could see myself getting a little bored toward the end, but then again, I can’t swim a 400m set without losing count. Some kind of A.D.H.D. I reckon.

The run scares the crap out of me. I ran a couple of half marathons last winter, and I was pretty happy to cross the finish line. I couldn’t imagine turning around and doing it again, let alone coming off the bike. I am not the best runner, but I consider myself to be pretty decent and it still scares me.

I reckon it boils down to something I said to the triage nurse after I crashed; go hard or go home. Endurance athletes are kind of an all or nothing kinda group; give us a challenge and come hell or high water, we will not only finish but do it with a smile on our faces. We will train smart, fuel even smarter, and prepare weeks ahead of the actual race. We will live and breathe it.

Oh, and there is not a single event outside of the Badwater Ultra Marathon that embodies the go hard or go home mentality more than Ironman.

Not that I am going to sign up for Ironman anytime soon. The training hours are way to much for the family right now, and besides, I am enjoying where I am at right now. If it aient broke, don’t fix it right?

Question: Was your first race Ironman? If so, first of all, awesome; second of all, why?


Recap – Week 41

Theme of the week? Recovery.

20120723-192048.jpg

Swim – 2:00:00 – 5050m
Bike – 0:45:00 – 25.26km
Run – 0:33:13 – 6.87km

Total – 3:18:33

Not the good kind of recovery, like after a great training block or a race where you gave it your all, but the phlegm producing, I’m almost better kind of recovery. I haven’t been this sick for a long time. Typically I can kick a cold or flu to the curb in about 3 days and be none worse for the wear, but this one stuck around for a while.

I was able to get on the trainer Friday night for the first time this fall. Exciting right? Well, actually it wasn’t all that bad. One thing I found in addition to the five points for pro trainer in my post, To Ride or Not to Ride, is that the trainer will show you very quickly any problems with your mechanics. You can hear instantly when you have a choppy pedal turnover and make adjustments on the fly to correct the problem. I also like the power readings; I don’t ride with a power meter for a couple reasons, cost being the first and foremost.

I also got out Sunday night for a run at about 2030; I forgot how great it is to run under the stars. It was a great run and I returned home a little quicker than anticipated. I thought about heading out for a another loop, but having a whopping total of 0km the previous week, I figured a good 30 minutes a great start to getting back into things.

Top Posts
Ironman Tattoo
Am I Becoming a Roadie?
About Me

1310_JDB_Kona_11565

Ironman World Championship went this weekend, and from what I saw and read, it was a great race. I know a couple of age groupers who qualified at Ironman Wisconsin about a month back, and I am secretly a little jealous. It would be an experience and a half to line up at Kona with arguably the best triathletes on arguably the toughest course in the world.

Case in point: Mirinda Carfrae dominates the run and finishes with a course record. Not only that, I only count two faster run splits all day from the entire field. Being around this excellence has to rub off doesn’t it?

I could use a little of that run speed.

Question: Did you tune in race day? What are your thoughts?


Recap – Week 32

Race week. My favorite kind of week.

transition

Swim – 1:13:37 – 3440m
Bike – 2:18:53 – 65.15km
Run – 1:26:42 – 17.81km
Race – 2:23:23 – 51.5km
Total – 7:22:34

I have been kicking around the idea of a weekly recap for a while now. Like I mentioned a couple of posts ago, I am not sure if my life is interesting enough to fill an entire post each week, but I reckon it is worth a go.

My triathlon season came to a close this past weekend with a great race for both me and my daughter in Lake Chaparral. I didn’t hit my goal of sub 2:15:00, but with the slight issue I had on the run, I am happy with my result. I may have gone too hard on the bike, or I may have slacked a bit on my run training the month previous. Vacation can do that to you. I still improved on my time from last year by a full 8 minutes and placed in the top 10.

Monday was a holiday, so I used the day off to head for a long bike ride. To sum it up in one word, wind. It was a slow ride out at 25km/hr, but with the wind at my back coming home, it was much better. I averaged 55km/hr peaking at 62km/hr heading into Calgary. Had a great time. Run Tuesday with 3x3min Fartlek intervals. I had a hard time jogging between the intervals and ended up walking between 2 and 3 for about 2 minutes. This was my first indication that my run fitness may not be as good as I had planned. No matter, I finished the run strong and chalked it up to a rough day.

Began my taper on Thursday with a short run to loosen up my legs and started to get ready mentally for my upcoming race.

Race weekend started on Saturday with the Kids of Steel for my daughter. We had a great time even though she didn’t rush too much. Hey, if it isn’t fun for a 6 year old, why even do it. Right? After her race, I slung the wetsuit on for a quick swim around the course to get my sighting targets and take my equipment for a test run. All good. Race went decent on Sunday morning, even though some kids (I assumed kids) knocked over the portable toilets and smelled up transition. Placed 8th overall with a decent swim and great bike. Mentioned my run fitness, yeah, I struggled there.

So that is the end of my 2013 Triathlon race season. I had a good year racing, with decent performances in all of my races. I still have a bunch of run races scheduled for the remainder of the year, including my attempt at a 10k PR in early September. We are heading out for a well deserved vacation in the coming weeks and this time I am going to leave the bike and shoes at home. I think I earned the upcoming days off.

I have read a lot about the Whole 30 program over the past 6 months. It makes a ton of sense, but while I was training hard, I shied away from it as I was concerned about the restrictiveness of the program. I have hit the non optimal foods pretty hard over the past months as mainly my will power has lacked along with my planning. I think it is about time to hit the ‘reset’ button and give the Whole 30 a rip, so starting September 1, I am in.

I will create a separate page dedicated to my challenge, charting my progress and some of my meals along the way. You all helped me complete the 21 Day No Sugar Detox, so I am calling on you again to help me this time around.

Top Posts for the Week
Ironman Tattoo
Hotels, Family, and Training
Calvin and Hobbes

Seems to be a pattern over the past 3-4 months. Ironman must be in full swing as that post has been top spot for a long time now. Congratulations if you became and ‘Ironman’ over the past year; I can’t imagine doing it myself right now. Possibly in the future.


Ironman Tattoo

M. Dot.

im

It seems like a right of passage. Cross the finish line and straight to the tattoo parlour. The more I see them around the gym, pool, path, or beach these days, I wonder if I would get one.

First, to qualify I am sure you have to finish a long distance Triathlon, all 226.3 kilometers of it. Second, you need to be proud of it. How could you not be? Not many people would attempt it, let alone finish it.

I think there is a stigma around people who have an Ironman tattoo. Some opinions say that ‘are they not proud of anything else than finishing that race x years ago’. I don’t think this is the case; starting, let alone finishing a long distance triathlon is a feat. I think it is a celebration of something that they have worked hard at achieving. Trust me, the amount of training hours that come along with the finish can be staggering. Average 11 hours per week with 3 hour bike rides on Saturday and 2 hours runs on Sunday; not to mention strength training and your real life. This is what I averaged in preparation for Ironman 70.3 Calgary, a half distance triathlon.

So back to my original thought.

Would I ever get a tattoo?

I love this sport and all of the tangible and intangible benefits that have come along with it. I am in the best shape of my life, my energy levels are thru the roof, and my daughter is racing as well. I will talk about it with anyone that asks, and hey, alot of people who don’t (sorry if you have been one of the unwilling listeners in the past). The people I have met including instructors, physiotherapists, and fellow triathletes over the past two years have made a positive impact on my life. Thank you for that.

I just find it hard to want to advertise it to the entire world, all the time. I mean having people check out your tattoo, check you out (elevator look?), then make a judgment based on your current physical condition is something I would like to avoid. “He has an Ironman tattoo, he doesn’t look like he could finish the walk up the stairs!”

I am just saying I don’t think that I would get one. Better to leave the memory where it belongs, in my mind.

Just a thought: Do you need to show proof, like a picture of you crossing the finish line or a secret membership card? I sure hope so.

Question: Would you get an Ironman Tattoo?